25 March SME INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS NETWORKING MEETING

25 March 2022

 

WE ARE YOUR GATEWAY TO THE WORLD! 

The objective is to enable SME’s to do business with partners from all over the world. 

 

We have had a very successful meeting in which some of the companies will continue to be in contact for mutual collaboration. Thank you for sharing your experiences and the challenges involved in doing business internationally.

Thank you!

See you on 29 April to Meet Match and Do Business!

Companies and countries:

SLP Interancional Ltd international, United Kigdom

Galve Internacional, The Netherlands

ReGen Villages Holding BV, The Netherlands

NKJ Strategic Solutions, South Africa

Leos Trumps, India

Auersmont School of Etiquette, Australia

ProtocolToday Consulting and Academy, The Netherlands

New Economy Strategies, The Netherlands.

See you on 29 April to Meet Match and Do Business!

                                                        Free participation

SOFT POWER DIPLOMACY

Japan’s soft diplomacy phenomenon is portrayed through “Pop Culture Diplomacy.” The Japanese government’s program uses anime (animated cartoons) and manga (a comic style) to achieve a foreign policy goal. The use of pop culture as a diplomatic strategy stands in appealing, warm, and humane opposition to the threat of military power. While reliance on pop culture as a means of soft diplomacy and nation branding has significant potential for international relations, nations must be cautious in developing these practices. Recent initiatives in Japan, Britain, Turkey and the United States reveal the possible benefits and pitfalls of soft diplomacy and nation branding through popular culture.

Soft Power

Joseph Nye Jr, a political scientist during the 1980s, defined soft power as a country’s ability to influence others without resorting to coercive pressure. When put into practice, it entails a process where countries project their values, ideals, and culture across borders to foster goodwill and strengthen partnerships. The concept of soft power was first used in 1990 by the American Political Scientist Joseph Nye. In his article, Nye focuses on how America will rebuild the hegemonic power of the unipolar world after the Cold War. The debate has been shaped around ‘how power has changed in international relations. Countries must constantly renew themselves in the global competition.

Countries have developed tools and strategies to help them outperform their competitors in global competition. The country’s soft powers and brand are the most important tools. Positive images of the countries attract investment, tourism, and security. The country brand has evolved into an essential soft power tool in this context. The countries’ brand values and soft powers directly impact one another. Countries with a high brand value also have effective soft power. A country’s soft power is primarily based on three factors: its culture (in places where it is appealing to others), its political values (when they are upheld at home and abroad), and its foreign policies (when they are seen as legitimate and having moral authority.)

Soft Power Diplomacy

Soft diplomacy is one of those words with a hazy definition that you recognise when you see it. Typically, it refers to attempts to engage directly with the public in indirect ways; it’s diplomacy’s soft power equivalent in that the goal isn’t so much to accomplish a specific substantive task as it is to try and change the fundamental basis on which a diplomatic relationship exists between countries. In and of itself, diplomacy evolves from the IR theory of Liberalism, which promotes cooperation among state actors for the peaceful resolution of conflicting issues in a win-win situation. As a big fan of Joseph Nye’s work on liberalism and soft power, I can say that soft diplomacy is based on the same idea.

Soft diplomacy is a process of mutual empowerment in which no direct goal-oriented action is taken, but efforts are channelled indirectly to achieve the goal. There is some debate about whether the affected state actors will directly participate. I believe that state actors are involved in some cases, and some indirect state actors engage in soft diplomacy.

European Union Soft Power Diplomacy

The EU is a leading intergovernmental organisation, and its success inspires non-member states to join the European integration project. The EU’s “soft power” stems from its willingness to offer a seat at the decision-making table, built on this promising foundation. This attractiveness ensures peace and security among European states, and the EU enlargement process strengthens the EU’s position on a global scale. As a result, the EU’s soft power benefits its member countries and the EU itself. This attractiveness ensures peace and security among European states, and the EU enlargement process strengthens the EU’s position on a global scale. Thus, the EU’s soft power benefits both its member countries and the EU itself. Soft power is being used by rising powers such as Russia, China, and India. Soft power and public diplomacy are lacking in developing countries.

Examples of Soft Power Diplomacy:

Korea

From the Gangnam style dance moves to the crazed fans of Korean pop groups like BTS, Twice, Black Pink, and the Oscar-winning film Parasite, as well as a large following of soft romance in Korean dramas. Korea is the new entertainment industry leader, in addition to establishing a foothold in the cosmetics and fashion industries, which have taken the world by storm.

India

India’s long history, culture, and civilisation is the most significant factor. These have drawn intellectuals and ordinary people from all over the world to India. So many brilliant minds from all over the world would not be working as Indologists if they were not attractive. Being in a strategic location and a global powerhouse of Asia, India also exercises soft power diplomacy through its vast diaspora, IT and pharmaceutical industries, and a foreign policy that values its neighbours.

China

China is one of the most powerful nations in terms of soft power diplomacy, from a global economic powerhouse to a centre of rich culture and traditions. China is a land that has it all, including our favourite Pandas, who are one of the key Chinese soft power diplomacy instruments.

Germany

Germany wields considerable influence and soft power in public policy, foreign relations, and international affairs. (Not afraid to criticise Russia or even support Iran for the JCPOA.) Germany is also a major contributor to global donations to international organisations and the most influential advocate for environmental protection, conservation, and sustainable development.

Conclusion

Soft Power is about winning people’s hearts and minds at its most basic. As a result, a people-centred approach is required. Governments cannot do much more than facilitating the process in this regard. Even if the concept of Soft Power is imprecise, Joseph Nye did well to highlight this important aspect of countries’ foreign policies. There is no country today that does not value this factor. Academics and intellectuals can be crucial in this endeavour.

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PROTOCOLTODAY ACADEMY OF PROTOCOL & SOFT DIPLOMACY

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Writer by Eric Muhia, International Studies and Diplomacy Graduate Student.

21 March 2022, Kenya

Category: Diplomacy

Reference: EM210322D    

We are a capacity development company connecting values, cultures, organisations, individualsand societies around the world

MASTERCLASS DIPLOMATIC WRITING SKILLS (GMS-5)

15 April 2022

Reserve the preferred date.

Mode of Study: Online

Time: 10:00 – 14:00 | 16:00 – 20:00 hrs, GMT (The Netherlands)

Fee one masterclass early bird €72.00, normal price €80.00 including:

  • Method action Learning model;
  • Digital material;
  • Personalized assessment;
  • Certificate EQF 7 level of ProtocolToday Academy.

BECOME A MINDFUL EXECUTIVE WITH THE SKILLS TO NAVIGATE
& OPERATE SMOOTHLY AROUND THE GLOBE

Global Mindset Skills
Learn Today & Practice Today

 

The world is transforming into a global village and needs executives who can navigate smoothly across cultures.
Globalization is changing the world in every aspect. Traditional industrial economies are transforming into entrepreneurial economies. There is a need for leaders, entrepreneurs, directors, managers, government officials, consultants, and executives with global mindset skills, e.g. the skills for profound relations management with people from different cultures and with different values.

Diplomatic communication and correspondence are the keys to formal contact between states and between states and international organizations (e.g. the UN). Diplomatic communication is about communicating decisions, expressing approval/disapproval, congratulations, arrangements, initiating contacts, making proposals, and threatening.

Key topics include:

  • Critical thinking;

  • Critical awareness of the right and wrong way to use language;

  • How to observe protocol and corresponding language;

  • The use of diplomatic language in management of international relations;

  • Writing notes, letters, memoranda, and other documents;

  • Resolutions, memoranda of understanding (MOUs), and treaties;

  • Drafting of reports, speeches, statements and declarations;

  • Symbols and Logo’s;

  • Terms of address;

  • Structure and layout of documents;

  • Sign off documents.

Participants:

  • Government Representatives: Ambassadors, Diplomats, Honorary Consuls & Embassy Staff;
  • Business Professionals: Entrepreneurs, Consultants, Business Development Professionals;
  • Executives & Professionals: National & Local Government’s Officials, City Marketing & Investments Promotion Executives | International Organizations Staff;
  • Professionals are active in the Hospitality & Tourism Industry.

INSIGHTS IN DUTCH ECONOMIC & BUSINESS STRUCTURE AND FRAMEWORK (IDE-21-G)

2022

Reserve the preferred date.

Mode of Study: Online or in-class in any country around the world.

Our training programs enables executives to represent themselves and their organisation with excellence, distinction and capabilities to bridge cultural and diplomatic gaps.

 

Key topics:

  • Geo-economic structure of The Netherlands;
  • The Dutch innovation framework;
  • Top-sector policy;
  • Governmental and private organizations active in entrepreneurship and international business;
  • Funding and financing tools.

Participants:

  • Government Representatives: Ambassadors, Diplomats, Honorary Consuls & Embassy Staff;
  • Business Professionals: Entrepreneurs, Consultants, Business Development Professionals;
  • Executives & Professionals: National & Local Government’s Officials, City Marketing & Investments Promotion Executives | International Organizations Staff;
  • Professionals are active in the Hospitality & Tourism Industry.

MASTERCLASS BUSINESS ETHICS & PROFESSIONALISM (GMS-2)

22 February | 12 April 2022 

Mode of Study: Online

Time: 10:00 – 14:00hrs | 16:00 – 20:00hrs GMT (The Netherlands) 

Fee one masterclass early bird €65.00, normal price €72.00, including:

• Method action Learning model;
• Digital material;
• Personalised assessment;
• Certificate EQF 7 level of ProtocolToday Academy

BECOME A MINDFUL EXECUTIVE WITH THE SKILLS TO NAVIGATE
& OPERATE SMOOTHLY AROUND THE GLOBE

Global Mindset Skills
Learn Today & Practice Today

The world is transforming into a global village and needs executives who can navigate smoothly across cultures.
Globalisation is changing the world in every aspect. 

Professionals and those working in acknowledged professions must exercise specialist knowledge and skills. How the use of this knowledge should be governed when providing a service to the public can be considered a moral issue and is termed professional ethics.

Business Ethics and Professionalism are about the capabilities of individuals to making judgments, applying their skills, and reaching informed decisions in situations.

Key topics include:

  • Verbal and nonverbal communication; 

  • Professional communication; 

  • The art of conversation both in person and on phone; 

  • The art of conversation both in person and on phone and the right way of behaving online in a business context; 

  • Dealing with ethical dilemmas, personal issues, and difficult people; 

  • Effective communication; 

  • The importance to be tactful; 

  • How to develop tact’; 

  • Written communication;

  • Communication with influence; 

  • Communication with diplomacy; 

  • The pillars of understanding.

Participants:

  • Government Representatives: Ambassadors, Diplomats, Honorary Consuls & Embassy Staff;
  • Business Professionals: Entrepreneurs, Consultants, Business Development Professionals;
  • Executives & Professionals: National & Local Government’s Officials, City Marketing & Investments Promotion Executives | International Organizations Staff;
  • Professionals are active in the Hospitality & Tourism Industry.

How to Apply: Full and send the registration form, specify the name of the masterclass and days, we will send you the program and the bank detail to submit the fee of participation to confirm your seat.

MASTERCLASS INTERNACIONAL BUSINESS PROTOCOL (GMS-3)

23 February | 5 April | 13 April | 14 June 2022

Mode of Study: Online

Time: 10:00 – 14:00hrs. | 16:00 – 20:00hrs CET (The Netherlands)

Fee one masterclass early bird €65.00, normal price €72.00, including:

  • Method action Learning model;
  • Digital material;
  • Personalized assessment;
  • Certificate EQF 7 level of ProtocolToday Academy.

BECOME A MINDFUL EXECUTIVE WITH THE SKILLS TO NAVIGATE
& OPERATE SMOOTHLY AROUND THE GLOBE

Global Mindset Skills
Learn Today & Practice Today

The world is transforming into a global village and needs executives who can navigate smoothly across cultures.
Globalisation is changing the world in every aspect. 

In today’s global economy and cross border operations there is an increasing need for understanding diplomatic protocol and make the right impressions.

Protocol is knowing how to be comfortable and at ease, empowered with confidence and authority to make others feel truly welcomed and comfortable.

It is about creating the right environment for business and making impact while maintaining courtesy and politeness in international affairs; meetings with ambassadors, government officials, international organisations, multinationals, corporations and companies.

Key topics iclude:

  • International protocol and soft diplomacy;

  • Enhanced personal, professional image, first impressions; 

  • Corporate and diplomatic communication skills; 

  • Business communication with partners from all over the world;

  • Strategies to gain an international edge;

  • Flags; 

  • Protocol in the car;

  • Seating protocol by a meeting;

  • Importance of rank & status; 

  • Make an effective entrance & mingle.

Participants:

  • Government Representatives: Ambassadors, Diplomats, Honorary Consuls & Embassy Staff;
  • Business Professionals: Entrepreneurs, Consultants, Business Development Professionals;
  • Executives & Professionals: National & Local Government’s Officials, City Marketing & Investments Promotion Executives | International Organizations Staff;
  • Professionals are active in the Hospitality & Tourism Industry.

How to Apply: Fill and send the registration form, specify the name of the masterclass and days, we will send you the program and the bank detail to submit the fee of participation to confirm your seat.

MASTERCLASSES FOR DIPLOMATS & EXECUTIVES WORKING IN THE NETHERLANDS (MGO-21-F)

2022

Reserve the preferred date.

Online or in-class in any country worldwide.

BECOME A MINDFUL EXECUTIVE WITH THE SKILLS TO NAVIGATE
& OPERATE SMOOTHLY AROUND THE GLOBE

Global Mindset Skills
Learn Today & Practice Today

Our training programs enable executives to represent themselves and their organisation with excellence, distinction and capabilities to bridge cultural and diplomatic gaps.

Business Etiquette in The Netherlands

Key topics:

  • Dutch soberness: “Doe Normaal”;

  • Business communication in The Netherlands;

  • Business card Protocol & Etiquette

  • Practices: punctuality and introductions;

  • Relations management: body language, handshake and networking.

Insights in Dutch Economic & Business Structure and Framework

Key topics:

  • Geo-economic structure of The Netherlands;
  • The Dutch innovation framework;
  • Top-sector policy;
  • Governmental and private organizations active in entrepreneurship and international business;
  • Funding and financing tools.

Target audience:

  • Ambassadors, Diplomats, Honorary consuls;

  • Government officials, PR staff, protocol officers, board members;

  • Employees/managers of NGO’s and international organizations;

  • Business executives & Entrepreneurs. Key topics.

How to Apply: Fill and send the registration form, specify the date and name of the masterclass, we will send you the program and the bank detail to submit the participation fee to confirm your seat.

DIGITAL DIPLOMACY IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

Digital diplomacy has become a new and increasingly popular strategy aiming to broaden access to the United Kingdom cultural context and make it more accessible to people worldwide in this age of information society. (Grincheva, 2012)The British Council is the central diplomatic organisation in the UK and the second biggest charity organisation globally, whose aim objective is to develop international cultural and educational relations with different countries worldwide while maintaining a non-governmental status. According to the Royal Charter, The British Council’s purpose is to widen the exposure and knowledge of the English language and promote a broader global understanding of the UK. British Council programs include building intercultural dialogue through digital media tools because digital media is one of the key tools used by the British Council to expand its outreach across the globe.

The UK is among the few countries that take digital diplomacy and policy very seriously, especially in its creative industry and cultural sectors. The UK is aware of the importance of digital potential in enhancing and preserving its national cultural heritage. The UK government established an institution called the National Archives of the UK, which preserves the heritage of the UK in a digital form to make it more accessible for people all over the world online. The National archives, which serve England, Wales and the UK, hold up to 1000 years of national records and up to until October 2011; The National Archives had a sub-body called the Museums Libraries and Archives Council and this partnership aimed at empowering national museums and libraries providing experience through connecting them to national cultural heritage. The British Council employs the full potential of new media like the internet to promote the richness of the arts and British culture. The museum galleries have been applying digital technologies to reach new audiences. A lot of online programs and websites have been developed by the British Council to provide access to creative and cultural products of the UK on a global scale.

Digital diplomacy in the UK aims to showcase the UK’s cultural, national superiority and excellence to wider audiences. The British Council uses diplomacy in promoting its innovative practices, like building more democratic and inclusive societies around the world. The UK applies digital media to support English language learning and mastery through online interactive resources like learning English websites used by over 2 million teachers and students worldwide, providing unlimited materials necessary for effective English language learning, practising and examination.

The United Kingdom’s national ambition is to ensure that it’s one of the world’s leading digital knowledge economies employing digital technologies in economic initiatives. The digital diplomacy group was established in the UK to make sure the foreign and commonwealth office in the UK is a world authority on the theory and practice of digital diplomacy.

In conclusion, digital diplomacy has become a platform for attention generation by diplomats. Diplomats, just like almost everyone else, are competing for attention. This has led to attempts by some diplomats to use jokes or entertaining posts to make statements and trends online. An example is a post made by the Joint Delegation of Canada at NATO in 2014, which through a satirical post accompanied by a regional map, critiqued Russian actions in Crimea. The post generated attention in the diplomatic world about the Russian invasion of Ukraine. (Wanless, 2014)

References

Grincheva, N. (2012). Digital Diplomacy. International Policy Frame transformation in Diplomatic Discourse.

VIP SPECIAL EDITION

PROTOCOLTODAY ACADEMY OF PROTOCOL & SOFT DIPLOMACY

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Writer by Eric Muhia, International Studies and Diplomacy Graduate Student.

03 March 2022, Kenya

Category: Diplomacy

Reference: EM030322D    

 

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