THE PROTOCOL IS A STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION TOOL

The protocol is a key tool in the relations of public bodies. It is communication used by institutions to convey different messages. This can be verified in countless situations and, above all, in numerous events, the latter being the space in which the protocol acquires its true meaning.

Of course, political communication is no stranger to this situation since taking care of the protocol and reinforcing it helps convey those messages or those ideas that go beyond the discourse itself. It continues to be key in relationships in public bodies.

Being clear about your rules makes a difference. Society has changed, so the protocol has had to adapt to the new times.

The era of digitalization is the factor of these changes. Still, protocol continues to be the guideline that marks the path for public institutions to succeed, both in the great political summits and in the daily relationship with the society they have chosen, as their representatives.

The Directorate of Protocol and Ceremonial of the municipality of General Deheza works tirelessly to achieve the objectives set by the officials that compose it. These objectives seek to facilitate a framework of order and structure in which actions can be carried out orderly. These are perfectly legislated through Ordinances and Decree and applied as the procedures and customs of the municipality.

It is a discipline with such a unique complexity that, by extension, it has also been assimilated into everything related to organizing events in the popular sphere. Well, it has begun to be claimed spontaneously outside the official sphere. Without knowing too much about this, different areas began to feel that it is a modern trend that adds significant value to reputation and what we now call mostly brand.

As protocol professionals, we have to bear in mind that its regulations are an essential ingredient, that they unify, affirm, and consolidate the values and political identity of the municipality.

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Writer by Gustavo Rafael Caballero, 

Specialist in Ceremonial and Protocol, and Journalist.

27 June 2022,  Argentina 

Category: Business Protocol

Reference: GR27062022BP    

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

THE ART OF COMMUNICATION IN BUSINESS

With the high usage of our mobile devices and other forms of media communication, people are shredding their common everyday skills of face-to-face interactions. Some people have difficulties when faced with the task of mingling in a crowd of unfamiliar and sometimes familiar acquaintances. We’d rather send a text message to someone in the same room than hold a personal conversation or avoid communication altogether. 

Good communication skills are still a vital part of our everyday interactions. A good Conversationalist can talk to anyone about anything in a laid-back, casual manner that sets people at ease. They can make a stranger feel like they have known them for years. Some people have a natural “sliver-tongue.” Being prepared with good communication skills will boost your chat in ways that make you a valued party guest or set you apart at a networking event, company functions, or a simple social gathering. For starters, listen more than you talk.

Ironically enough, the key to being a great conversationalist is not in the talking but in the listening. If you are conversing with someone and doing all the talking, you are probably the only one interested in what you say. Listen to what others have to say and listen well. This will also lead to questions you can ask to progress the conversations further. When asking questions, ask open-ended questions. Open-ended questions encourage the respondent to elaborate or provide details in their response. Closed-ended questions with a simple yes or no reply will ultimately send the entire conversation on a downward spiraling dead-end. 

Avoid political and religious topics unless you are attending your political party’s convention or a familiar religious function. Both of these areas deal with personal matters for many people and are not good for light conversations in mixed gatherings. They can sour a mood quickly. Also, keep in mind not to ask questions that are too personal or insulting. You want to make friends, not enemies. 

Take your turn. Whether the conversation is with one person or several, join in. A conversation is a group project with each person playing a part. Don’t just stand around like an eavesdropper. 

Contribute to the conversation. This is prime time to ask open-ended questions if you have nothing to add. On the other hand, don’t overshare or monopolize. It’s not a monologue. 

Everyone should contribute. When you add to the conversation, avoid talking or directing your conversation to only one person. Make eye contact with others in the group. Be careful not to interrupt others. 

Don’t be a Debbie or Donnie Downer. No one wants to engage in a conversation with someone who has nothing but negative comments about everything. People will exit your presence fast! It’s the quickest way to find yourself alone without anyone to engage with. Try to find the positive in the conversation and respond to that. 

Don’t engage in “one-upping.” So, what is one-upping? That is when you try to top someone else’s story. If you have a good story to share, find a way without making the other person feel their story was of no value. Not only is one-upping petty, but it’s also very rude. You may have a terrific story to tell but reconsider at the risk of deflating someone else’s balloon.

Think before you speak. Most foot-in-mount moments occur because of a failure to think before speaking. You never want to be offensive, and you don’t want to embarrass yourself or others. Be careful what you say. You never know who’s listening, nor do you know who others know. 

Be prepared with what to say and not say. Before you attend your event, think of some general topics and questions that will be of interest to anyone. “One of the easiest ways to start a conversation or stay in touch always offers value.” (Kesha Kent, Networking Is Your Superpower). Most of all, be friendly and confident. This will help you to be a savvy conversationalist. 

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Writer by Renita Jackson, Etiquette Specialist

14  June 2022, USA 

Category: Business Etiquette 

Reference: RJ14062022BE    

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

PERCEPTION ABOUT SUCCESS

Success is related to the conclusion of notable professional performances in our society. Consequently, there is a perception that it should be reflected in the possession of material goods, status, power, fame, and other components. For this reason, it is convenient to develop a discrepant notion.

It is common to meet people -of all ages, origins, and conditions- who work, save and struggle to achieve it. There is the mistaken impression that Success is distant, unattainable, and, by the way, is associated with comfort and social prestige.

The prosperous Mexican tycoon Carlos Slim Helú -one of the richest men in the world- offers an interesting, simple, and different appreciation: “Success has nothing to do with what many people imagine. It is not due to the noble and academic titles, nor to the inherited blood or the school where you studied. It is not due to the dimensions of your house or how many cars fit in your garage. It’s not about whether you’re a boss or a subordinate; or if you are a prominent member of social clubs. It has nothing to do with the power you wield or if you are a good administrator or speak beautifully if the lights follow you when you do it. It is not because of the clothes or if you put the dazzling acronyms that define your social status after your name. It’s not about whether you’re an entrepreneur, speak multiple languages, or are attractive, young or old.”

Likewise, in his letter to the university community (1994), he presents a profound and truthful reflection: “… Success is not doing things well or very well and having the recognition of others. It is not an external opinion; it is an internal state. It is the harmony of the soul and its emotions, which needs love, family, friendship, authenticity, integrity”.

From my point of view, the compliments, promotions, and distinctions received at a professional and work level are not always synonymous with Success. Relating it to the external is a mistake. Its full achievement is observed in the inner world of each one of us. In our personal, spiritual being and, therefore, in the attitude assumed towards life.

I like the words of the Mexican intellectual José Luis Barradas Rodríguez: “Being successful in the little things you do lifts your spirits and self-esteem and prepares you to be successful in the big things you do.” There is the central point of my reflection. Victory begins with achievements and conquests forged by perseverance and commitment inspired by self-esteem.

Purify the internal sphere of fears, suspicions, obstinacy, grudges, complexes, and negative feelings that contaminate the positive vision of tomorrow and, therefore, slow us down. Let us be able to carry out an intense internal cleaning to achieve our development and growth.

Let us avoid worrying about the external, as is usual in third-world societies. An expert with outstanding academic degrees, a good salary, car of the year, large credit cards, the latest fashions, and a member of representative social clubs, yet overwhelmed by hatred, conscience, prejudice, frustration, and family heartbreak. , etc. Will it be successful? Those who do not know the details of their sphere could probably envy their “success.”

Let’s avoid placing this qualification on a mortal only because of his labor and economic merits. Let’s look beyond what is related to work to assess other areas -we do not perceive with the naked eye- and judge what has been achieved by our peers. Let us be diligent and profound in our observations. Also, let’s take what they can make us believe about our supposed triumphs with serenity.

On more than one occasion, I think of its complex definition. Each one has, with all rights, their evaluation and interpretation that is reflected in the actions destined to achieve Success. One man may believe that Success has a job, another being a general manager, and a third becoming the company’s owner. What is questionable is necessarily “uniformizing” Success with the superficial, material, and monetary, without considering what life offers to achieve personal improvement beyond competitiveness in the labor market.

A few weeks ago, two of my students from the San Ignacio de Loyola Institute (ISIL), Allinson Liza and Fiorella Larrea -students full of commitment, talent, hope, goodwill and who feed our illusion in teaching- asked me: Which do you think What is the factor for Success? I answered: “I believe that Success is in a sum of small details. If they remember her when she leaves; if you leave a positive mark in this life; if along its path it shed seeds and others picked them up; if more people consider you their friend than those who you suppose to be their friends; if he manages to get up every day with a clear conscience, exhibiting clean hands and pockets; if you have inner peace and enjoy your work, you are successful. In such a way that my definition differs from the one that, by custom, is had in our environment”. Welcome Success, dear reader.

http://wperezruiz.blogspot.com/

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Writer by Wilfredo Peréz, teacher and consultant in organizing events, protocol, professional image, and social etiquette.

31 May 2022,  Peru 

Category: Business Etiquette 

Reference: WP31052022BE    Photography: Aziz  Acharki

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

QUALITY FIRST IMPRESSIONS  

As the business world slowly reopens post-Covid, many people are finding the need for in-person connections for job interviews, first day on the job, career fairs or maybe networking events. Whatever the reason for your face-to-face interactions, be prepared to make your connection a standout exchange. Here are six steps to help you make quality first impressions as you approach others.

Stand during an introduction- Unless you are at the dining table or have some impairment that might cause difficulty doing so, you should stand. It is not only a professional thing to do; it’s a courteous gesture that shows respect to the other person. It lets the other person know you are eager to meet them.

Smile – It improves your face value! A smile is a universal language. You may be wearing a designer dress or a custom-tailored suit, but a warm smile is a valuable and positive feature that will add volumes to your appearance. It lets others know you are friendly.

Make Eye Contact – Avoid looking down at the floor or the scenery behind the person. Look people in their eyes during an introduction and when holding a conversation with them. It helps build your confidence and shows your interest in others—many people with low self-esteem struggle in this area. If you need help, try this tip; when talking with someone, look at the bridge of the person’s nose. It looks like you are still looking into their eyes.

Shake Hands – It shows excellent manners to shake hands with the person you meet. Shake with your right hand, which is acceptable by most cultures globally.

Shake for approximately 2-3 seconds or two up and down hand pumps. No wimpy wilted fish handshakes and no bone-crushing ones either! If you tend to have clammy hands, dry them before shaking someone’s hand. Keep a handkerchief or tissue in your hand for a quick dry-off before a shake. No one wants to shake a wet hand.

Say Your Name – Say both your first and last names. If you have an honorific or title such as Dr. or Mrs. or a designation such as PhD, M.D., or Esq., avoid using it for yourself while making general introductions. Just give your name. You may use the honorific if necessary in the introduction, such as a doctor meeting a patient’s family for the first time.

Repeat Their Name – When introduced, repeat the person’s name to make sure you pronounce it correctly. It also helps you remember their name and makes the other person feel respected. When parting, repeat their name and let them know it was a pleasure meeting them.  If you forget a person’s name, apologise, and ask them to repeat their name for you. By the way, if someone mispronounces your name, kindly correct them. No harm done.

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Writer by Renita Jackson, Etiquette Specialist.

02 May 2022,  U.S.A 

Category: Business Etiquette 

Reference: RJ02052022BE    

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

HANDLING CONFLICTS

Conflicts are inevitable. As long as humans walk the face of the earth, there will be confrontations. From issues as minor as scheduling two appointments simultaneously on your planner to disputes between family members and co-workers or political disagreements within the government, everyone will deal with conflicts on some level and in some manner.

For the most part, no one wants to enter into a personal conflict or disagreement intentionally. Conflicts can cause quite a stir of raw emotions and defences. If not handled correctly, it can cause many misunderstandings, severed relationships, financial hardships, unexpected reactions, or other issues and problems.

One of the best protocols for handling conflict is to avoid conflicting issues before they arise. However, that is not always an option.

When handling conflict, consider these guidelines:

Promptly – When an unavoidable issue arises, address it promptly or as quickly as possibly allowed to avoid the situation from escalating more. Don’t allow conflict to ferment. Many unpleasant problems can be resolved more civilly if just addressed promptly. Accidents, mistakes and slip-ups happen. Try to make corrections to mend the situation and move forward when they do.

Professional – Handle conflicts professionally. Something may have gone awry and not the way planned initially; however, don’t break the protocol of being professional. Think of reasonable, agreeable solutions to rectify the error.  

Private – When a negative situation does occur (and once again, they will), if at all possible, try to resolve the problem in private with all the parties involved. Who does the conflict affect? If the matter only concerns one other person or a small group of people, keep the case with them only.

It is crucial to remember to handle the issue in private only if it can be done in a safe environment and without causing any further harm to someone else or something else.  

Public – If your conflict was public, it might be necessary to handle the resolution publicly. This may even involve public apologies or corrections. If so, take it with no dramatics and as professionally as possible. 

“Make wise choices. Every choice you make has a consequence.”

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Writer by Renita Jackson, Etiquette Specialist 

06 April 2022, U.S.A  

Category: Etiquette 

Reference: RJ06042022BE    

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

ANALYZING NETiquette’s VIRGINIA SHEA’S ADVISE (1)

Nowadays, overlooking NETiquette’s principles is practically equivalent to not knowing how to read or write since it is the way we are communicating in recent years. Doing it incorrectly can cause us some difficulties.

Although it may seem incredible, and despite the fact that this term took shape almost 30 years ago, many people still do not know it, and if they have heard of it, in many cases, they have not paid the necessary attention.

Thanks to the evolution of networks, spreading the many rules of this subject has not become as complicated as a literacy process would have been in past centuries; However, it is difficult to find people capable of recognising that they have much to learn about this branch, either due to lack of humility or because it is difficult to believe that it is necessary to handle behavioural principles for something as simple as writing and the use of the varied resources that technology provides today by means of electronic devices at our fingertips.

It must become an academic subject, but until that happens throughout the world, we are going step by step to deepen each of the aspects that involve the extensive knowledge of NETiquette under a global business approach. To begin this task, we will focus on the book “Netiquette” by Virginia Shea, known by many people who “The 10 Core Rules of Netiquette” was released for the first time 27 years ago, in 1994. So let’s get started!

Remember the human on the other side of the electronic communication. In online communication, it is very easy to forget that there is a human being who will receive our messages or someone behind the words we read. It’s easy to respond to a negative comment because it reads on a screen instead of looking into a person’s eyes. An implicit and misguided “freedom” often encourages acting or writing without prudently weighing the consequences.

As it is not a face-to-face task, we will not know with certainty the tone, emotion, intention, and expression of the person who transmits and receives a text or even the intensity of a message, which can lead to misinterpretations with serious and irreversible consequences.  A misunderstanding creates a terrible impression of someone who does not even know – (On the Internet, “the first impression” is stronger than in the face-to-face world) – since the way of expressing themselves, the way they answer, the attention paid, diligence, and other aspects of behaviour, mark important guidelines in the perception of those who read us, even more so in the business world.

We have to understand that poor communication skills online and showing a negative or wrong image could break relationships, destroy a reputation, or create significant group conflicts.

It is not surprising that meetings have become information by email, video calls, or video conferences in today’s business world. The pre-warning or rebuke that must be given in person is now given through a chat message or online communication. In the same way, corporate chat groups are something very common, such as the need for a Human Resources record. Here, we must ask ourselves if the administrators of these groups can support and consolidate that group of people with the characteristics and skills of a Public Relations Officer, understanding that they are in the position, not just adding or removing participants but even blocking or censor certain posts. That role function requires greater responsibility since he is responsible for several people who cannot see each other. That due to a negative cerebral predisposition when communicating systems that do not provide the clarity of what is said and what is meant, they tend to misinterpret or react adversely to an endless list of ambiguous messages or instructions that lead to a series of dislikes and difficulties that are not always easy to fix.

On the other hand, let’s not forget that everyone has the right to privacy and free time, so considering the company chats as an extension of the office is a serious mistake. The hours and days off must be respected outside working hours. The administrators of business groups or bosses must behave themselves under rules of respect and the emblem of considering others in their private lives that they would expect of themselves.

It is necessary to emphasise that online contact does not allow implicit communication; therefore, it becomes ambiguous and can be easy to offend or be offended. There is a great risk from the negativity bias in our mind programs to interpret ambiguity as unfavourable. Our messages must be carefully thought out to be sent, and an open mind is required to read those received. Who has not lived the fear of the message´s ghost that does not come with the idea that it is an unpleasant message? And when the messages arrive, if they are ambiguous, our brain will wander towards the worst possible interpretation.

For this reason, it is important to work to assume a positive intention on the part of our issuer/sender and provide a positive interpretation when reading. If we are convinced that it has a negative background, we should ask an explicit question in the most respectful way possible to clear up doubts. Based on these considerations, we have an obligation to aim for minimal or no ambiguity in our messages, with a transparent and trustworthy attitude. Sarcasm can be great for many people, but chat is not the right channel.

A retaining wall is thinking if our written words could be manifested head-on/straightforward. It is very easy to write negative words or comments because we do not see or perceive the expression of displeasure, anger, frustration, or even pain, of the person who receives them. If the answer is no, we should review and rewrite until we are certain that we are not sending something we do not mean to be sent. When the messages involve emotions, it is better to wait for some time to stall and if it is unfailing, opt for the face-to-face message or the telephone. If there is an extreme circumstance, we must express something that we know. It will not make the receiver happy; let us try to ensure that our message fully transmits what is required to be expressed and thus, avoid misinterpretations, such as an admonition or a dismissal that cannot be given directly due to distance or connection problems.

Considering the human condition of our recipients, we do not send offensive or inappropriate messages, which can be saved and disclosed. Let’s remember that once we send, we lose control of how far it goes. Surely the aggravated person could feel the right to make the inappropriate message known if the circumstances require it, even escalating to legal measures such as defamatory evidence or other major offence. There is the case of Oliver North, a White House email system user, PROFS, who naively and diligently deleted incriminating notes that he sent or received but was unaware that, elsewhere in the White House, the systems´ managers stored said notes that were later used as evidence against him during the trial in which he was convicted.

To end, there is the reference of the commercial world, in which the chat has become the customer´s favourite channel because it provides instant responses and, when it is a live chat, a “human” side is shown as part of the corporate branding. Furthermore, it has been proven that companies that offer adequate chat services attain a 6% growth.

On the opposite side, 47% of consumers complain about not having a positive chat experience, and it is not due to the answers that the person in charge of informing or attending can provide, but rather to how they write or express them. That can degrade or burden the customer experience by a large percentage. This bad experience can become even more intense if the chat service person in charge does not know NETiquette in terms of attention and service in networks. This experience could become disastrous for not having the ability to assume that we are dealing with a customer who expresses a need, in many cases, loaded with emotions that we cannot see but that must be prevented by responding with the necessary measures. Failure to do so and lack of knowledge can cause significant harm to business growth; however, this issue will be dealt with extensively in another section.

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Writer by: Claudia STOHMANN R. de A. Communicator, speaker, writer, etiquette, and protocol expert. 

27 October 2021, Bolivia 

Category: Business Etiquette 

Reference: CS271021BE    

 

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

NETIQUETTE IN THE CORPORATIVE WORLD

Cellular Phones.

For everyone, the mobile phone has become an indispensable tool. Executives, and people in the business world, are no exception. On the contrary, they use this tool to make work and contacts effective in a much more practical way than we would have imagined 20 years ago.

Because of the importance of its use at a business level, some standards set forth in the branch of NETiqueta; must be observed with more excellent care to give it proper use without harming our projection.

Here are some well-known standards and other tips that can help you improve your professional image:

  • The golden rule in the network’s world is: “The values ​​that we show in our personal and work life must transcend with more force in our online life.” Respect, empathy, and other values ​​such as honesty, transparency, consideration, etc., are the basis of the principle of treating others as we would like to be treated.
  • Let’s modulate our voice tone when talking on the cell phone. Even in the middle of a very noisy party, we do not need to shout. The new cell phones are equipped with powerful filters that neutralise background noises and help our interlocutor hear our voice with relative clarity. In all public places, the moderation of the volume when we are speaking is essential. If the person on the other side of the line cannot hear us and we are forced to raise our voice, it is appropriate to cover our mouth with the hand to minimise the resonance.
  • Let’s use good judgment with the ringtones and notification tones, considering the circumstances in which we will be involved. It is a detail that could make a difference in the image we want to show. As another act of courtesy, let’s avoid setting the ringtone for several minutes. When our favourite melody in the world begins to sound, let’s keep in mind that it is not for the entertainment of those around us. If we are executives or business people, let’s remember that our long, loud ringtones can be annoying.
  • We need to be careful with call hours and even messages. Traditional rules of Etiquette for landlines have been in place for many decades. We must be considerate of the schedules of our interlocutors. Not before 07:30 in the morning, during meal and nap hours, nor after 10:00 p.m. seeing the person “online” does not mean they are available and forced to answer us.
  • When we make a call, after a quick greeting, our first sentence should be the question: “Can you speak?” Perhaps the person who has answered us (no matter how closely or trustworthy they are) is in the middle of a meeting, driving, or in any event that is not the right one to take our call.
  • The easy availability that technology gives us to call and contact does not give us the right to interrupt or impose our need for a response. Let’s not assume that the person on the other side of the line has an obligation to attend to us immediately. If we are the ones who make the call, we have to think that it is not appropriate to insist on the calls, one after another, or to make “never-ending” calls until they finally answer us. Under a logical criterion, let’s think that everyone has their cell phones close enough to answer it immediately, so three rings should be more than enough to assume that the other person is not going to answer; So, on the third ring, let’s cut the call.
  • It is necessary to obey the rules of the ” No Cell Phone Use Zones”. When attending conventions, conferences, or certain places, you can see signs with the prohibition of cell phone use or notes asking that it please be turned off. As a well-educated person, this recommendation should be observed and followed.
  • The table in any dining room is a prohibited area for cell phones. It is considered a place of ceremony to eat, share, talk, and interact personally and directly. Within the rules of Etiquette, cell phones do not have space at the table. In the business world, the cell phone should be put on silent or turned off for the time of a business meal and, much better, kept in our briefcase or purse.
  • It is also not correct to hold it in our hand or place it exposed in the outer pocket. In addition, it is a matter of taking care of the image since carrying the cell phone in hand, or a very conspicuous place can be taken as an attitude of ostentation or insecurity.
  • When we enter a meeting or interview, the mobile should never be put on the table or the desk. It is a very negative non-verbal language signal that conveys what we are focused on and what we give more importance or attention to.
  • If a call or message is received in a face-to-face meeting, we should not answer. The smart thing is to assess its importance or urgency to apologise if it becomes necessary to respond. The live conversation takes precedence over a virtual conversation. If we have to answer, let us try to be brief out of respect for our interlocutor or interlocutors who deserve our full attention. We will ask for the necessary permission to leave the place and answer, trying to move to a place far enough away where our conversation does not disturb. Upon returning, we will give the excuses due for the intrusion. It should be known that it is not correct to start talking in the middle of a meeting, even in a low voice, or to cover our mouth to make it less annoying. It is a disrespectful attitude that interrupts and distracts those present.
  • In the same way, it is a terrible lack of respect that, in the midst of other people, we get distracted using the functions or applications of the device or, worse, checking the notifications of our networks. They are details that can wait. Surely, if something most important comes up, a call will happen.
  • We must be prudent in choosing the type of messages we send since it is assumed that, if we send something, it is because we agree with its content or in some way, it reflects our tastes, education, or position in relation to certain situations. Let’s be careful not to offend or cause discomfort.
  • An appointment should not be cancelled by message. Ideally, do it through a call. It will be a show of good manners and respect.
  • How we write our messages or the images we use must be a matter of care. Let us remember that it shows our level of training, good education, and consideration to those who read us. As a rule, within NETiquette, it should not be written in capital letters (CAPS), as it is a manifestation of raising one’s voice or shouting. On the other hand, we should not write in red or use emoticons if we are not completely sure of the meaning or use they have been created. To insist on good spelling and grammar doesn’t hurt.

Finally, without the intention of being obstinate in undermining the freedom of the mobile phone user, which may be considered by the owner “indispensable” (with few exceptions), we should consider that for many generations, it has been possible to subsist without this device and at present, due to the little knowledge of many, it has become a device of common use but of annoying abuse and that must be governed under the principles of the “REC Formula”: Respect, Education and Common Sense, like a base of all the rules of Etiquette & Protocol.

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Written by: Claudia STOHMANN R. de A. Communicator, speaker, writer, etiquette, and protocol expert. 

14 September 2021, Bolivia 

Category: Business Etiquette 

Reference: CS140921BE

 

ProtocolToday is an expert organization, Founded by professionals with years of experience in Cultural Intelligence and Soft Diplomacy. They offer well-researched training programs to help you prepare for the international presence. Enhance your abilities to dine, converse, and present at an international stage.

Become discreet and make your mark!

NETIQUETTE (Network Etiquette)

For more than 20 years, it is a term that has been gaining global significance as new technologies advance by leaps and bounds. Some societies adopted other similar names, but their function is the same. Coming from the apocope “Net” (Network) and “Etiquette”, “NETIQUETTE” is a worldwide base to take care of good behavior on the network. Today, we can share a lot of information on this topic in the many spaces that distance communication and online information media permit us.

While ICT’s world grows up, a new world for communication and information has emerged, that created the need to establish rules to facilitate and optimize the use of new technologies and networks in all their forms, even more In these times when the whole world has been forced to be on the net for contact, meetings, work, studies, and information exchange.

All these rules are based on general concepts of respect and a good level of communication. We understand that being non-face-to-face means of communication, we frequently forget that our voice tone, our expressions, and our gestures cannot be transmitted accurately; and whoever receives our messages cannot objectively judge our motives and intentions or, maybe they could misinterpret them if we do not express it optimally.

Within this global sphere of relationships, a vast majority have fully learned that, on the other side of our electronic devices, there is a world of people with different cultures, religions, beliefs, and positions. For this reason, we must apply respect, common sense, and good education to conduct ourselves in a space in which everyone fits and in which everyone deserves the tolerance and good treatment above our particular position. Then, this remembers us, that the consideration that we expect from others to us, is the same consideration that we must give to others.

In addition, our good education and training are visible in our actions and this is increased in the networks; that is, if we are used to being respectful and considerate to others in our face-to-face life, we will surely show the same online. But, when this does not happen, our bad behavior transcends in a more notorious way. Under this analysis, the use of “Netiquette” is important so we all learn to conduct ourselves with the necessary correction.

Definitely, globalization has opened great and unthinkable possibilities of benefits in the network, but we also find a big dark side. We are not always going to be in contact with polite people or with similar principles as ours; for this reason, undervalues like respect, tolerance, and good spirits, prudence must prevail to create and maintain reflective links with those people with whom we do not interact personally, either in a particular aspect or in the business world.

Initially, thanks to a publication of the Institute of Informatics Ethics (CEI – Computer Ethics Institute); – considered as the most prominent organization for ethical computer use in the United States, founded in 1985 by IBM and other important institutions, among them, Washington Consulting Group-, in 1992, they made the hallmark “The commandments for Computer Ethics” created by Ramón C. Barquin.[1]

These commandments became popular in recent years to persuade good behavior and ethics at the use of a computer. However, over time they have undergone some modifications and at present, I have taken the liberty of making an adaptation for the use of ICTs, considering that a large part of the population has access to a cellphone or other connected electronic devices to the Internet.

These ethics commandments are:

  • You will not use an ICT to harm others;
  • You will not interfere with the work of others;
  • You are not going to meddle in other people’s files or ICT files;
  • You will not use an ICT to steal or carry out fraud;
  • You will not use an ICT to discredit, defame or publish unreliable information;
  • You will not use software that is not legal;
  • You will not use the computer resources of another person without their authorization;
  • You will not appropriate other people’s intellectual work;
  • You should think about the social consequences of the program you write or the system you are designing;
  • You should use ICT in ways that show consideration and respect.

Today, these commandments have become a small base of ethics for the world of “Netiquette”, since the networks had arisen from a computer and spread to thousands of social sites, chats, forums, emails, blogs, different types of meetings, and endless connections in which our knowledge and behavior online are tested. With time, there are other rules that are adapted according to the needs that arise with modernity and technology.

As a reference, we must mention the book “Netiquette” published by Virginia Shea in 1994 that contains “The core rules of Netiquette”[2] and the publication of Sally Hambridge as a directive of Intel in 1995, an official document like a guide to the company employees, to behave on the Internet.

We might recognize that thanks to today’s technology, great capacities had been acquired. Let’s assume that the Internet has given us growing power and, therefore, it must be handled with great responsibility.

[1] http://www.ethicscodescollection.org/detail/411d6362-5ab5-438b-82de-7a3575412f40

[2] https://coursedesign.colostate.edu/obj/corerulesnet.html

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Written by Claudia STOHMANN R. de A. Communicator, speaker, writer, etiquette and protocol expert, and ProtocolToday writer. 

26 August 2021, Bolivia 

Category: Business Etiquette

Reference: CS260821BE

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