SOFT SKILLS PROPELLING PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS IN POST-PANDEMIC ECONOMY

The past two years brought unprecedented changes to how we live and work. As the second wave of The Great Resignation is forecasted to descend upon all industries in the middle of 2022, employers and employees are fundamentally rethinking their future strategies.

Whilst it is tough to foresee the true expend of changes and the lasting effects on post Pandemic world, it is evident that changes are here to stay.

Research conducted by Harvard University has consistently shown that 85% of career success is attributable to well‐developed soft and people skills. Traditionally, the emphasis on business etiquette was placed in a professional environment to build long term business relationships and customer rapport. In the current climate, however, employers began to recognise that people skills are necessary not only for potential candidates to stand out but also for corporations to preserve the talent they already have working for them.

The Pandemic catalysed the ever-growing dynamic equilibrium in the job markets worldwide, the most significant change since The Industrial Revolution. The aim is to excel in this short window of opportunities, where companies are willing to hire people with a wide range of experience and invest in the training of their employees. Whilst lack of industry-specific knowledge or expertise is eagerly acknowledged and supported by the employers, well-developed soft and people skills remain imperative components and criteria when hiring.

Working from home digitised the way we interact with our colleagues and clients. As for many of us, main channels of communication are emails, telephone calls and video conferencing; it is more vital than ever to possess the ability of clear and concise communication, good manners, and the ability to build strong relationships with people, whom we may never get to meet in person. Rapid globalisation and outsourcing of the workforce added a further layer of necessity to communicate with people from different cultures across the world effectively. We have found ourselves in a world where knowledge and skills have been placed on the same plateau with professional decorum and cross-cultural sensitivity.

As someone whose primary professional expertise are in STEM, my conclusions are based on a unique blend of diligent observations and firm comprehension that developing good soft and people skills is very much a multidimensional phenomenon. In my opinion, the single ability to switch up and adapt one’s vocabulary depending on the audience is the most critical life skill one can master. To excel in a professional environment, personal presentation, listening skills, and efficiency must be learned. But above all, even if professional development is not on your priority list, it is worth remembering that Ai is estimated to replace 40% of current jobs within the next 15 years. With this undisputable prognosis in mind, it is worth remembering that soft skills will remain the most sought for expertise in job markets across the globe.

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Write by Anastasia Martel, a specialist in Etiquette  

8 February 2022, United Kingdom

Category: Diplomacy

Reference: AM80222D

“Somos una empresa de desarrollo de capacidades que conecta valores, culturas, organizaciones, individuos y sociedades en todo el mundo”

AUSTRALIAN PUBLIC DIPLOMACY

PROTOCOL AND ETIQUETTE

In June 2018, Australia’s very own High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, the then titled Honourable Alexander Downer, and his Twitter faux pas splashed over the Australian news.  What did he do that made Aussie headlines?

Two weeks after officially leaving his post as High Commissioner, he used his ‘business’ account to tweet support to his daughter, Georgina Downer, who was forging a career in Australian politics.  The secretary of Foreign Affairs and Trade Department, Frances Adamson, stated that Alexander Downer “mistakenly used the account instead of his own” stated the Adelaide Independent New Indaily, Friday, Jun 1, 2018.

The rapid evolution of mobile technology, together with the emergence of social media, has significantly changed, to communicating instantly, letting millions know facts, figures, actions, reactions, and interactions.  How can social media and diplomacy work hand-in-hand?

Modern public diplomacy is used for the promotion and enhancement of a countries profile, critical humanitarian and consular events, and the explanation of economic developments.  The use of public diplomacy allows for open, transparent, and accountable dialogue, which enhances friendly relations, monitors events, gauges public sentiment, gathers information, and explains government policies and programs.  However, the Australian government states in an Administrative Circular of July 2014 that social media does not replace traditional avenues of announcements.

It was noted that in 2009 the United States Government piloted a program that used social media outlets such as Twitter and Facebook in the Middle East, “increasing citizen engagement and civic participation”.  Also, that year the Israeli Foreign Ministry said they wanted to use social media to “focus less on Palestinian issues and more on the Iranian threat.” (Zhang & Fahmy et al., 2015).

For those in the diplomatic or government services that are tweeting, blogging, and using social media to get their word across to the masses through real-time channels, what guidelines do they follow?  Guiding them is the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Ethics, Integrity and Professional Standards Policy Manual and the Department of Communications and Parliamentary Branch.  Which begs the question, what can we do as individuals that are not working for the government department? How can we use social media mindfully?  Here are four tips for using social media to your advantage:

“Is my social media account private?”

Whether you have a public or private profile on social media, you are still leaving a digital footprint.  Whatever you post in word, photo, video, audio, or emoji can be screen-grabbed and passed around quickly, without your knowledge.

“What are my intentions today?”

Post information you want people to know and won’t regret one week, one year, or ten years from posting.  Always post positively and professionally.  Using courtesy is the best practice today.

“How can I keep safe?”

Keep personal information, such as your address, birth date, etc. off social media as hackers are constantly harvesting and farming for your personal information.

“What content will I display and post today?”

Be wise with photos, audio, and videos you take of other people.  Try to pixelate, blur or cut people out the best you can unless you have their consent to publish.  Consider your comments and the emojis that you attach to your comments.  Emojis have a powerful effect as non-verbal cues.  Adding emojis to social posts could bring confusion in interpretation.

“Ensure Intercultural Intelligence”

Symbols, emojis, illustrations, metaphors, and even the contextual meaning of words can be interpreted and experienced differently across countries and cultures. Mind your social media had a borderless reach and can be resent by anyone who has received it directly or indirectly.

Make sure that you master intercultural intelligence so that your message is “global proof” and will not cause embarrassing situations for you and the entity that you are representing.

May you use social media wisely and mindfully.

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 Written by Elizabeth SOOS, an expert in Etiquette  

27 January 2022, Australia 

Category: Diplomacy 

Reference: ES270121D

ProtocolToday is an expert organization, Founded by professionals with years of experience in Cultural Intelligence and Soft Diplomacy. They offer well-researched training programs to help you prepare for the international presence. Enhance your abilities to dine, converse, and present at an international stage.

Become discreet and make your mark!

PROTOCOL GUIDE FOR DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS AND CONSULAR POST THE NETHERLANDS

This Protocol Guide is issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as part of our efforts to be a transparent and good host to our distinguished guests. It contains practical information based on the Dutch authorities’ interpretation of the rules for privileged persons.

Protocol Guide for Diplomatic Missions and Consular Posts1 Protocol and Host Country Affairs Department2

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

January 2021

Protocol Guide for Diplomatic Missions and Consular Posts1

 https://www.government.nl/documents/leaflets/2015/04/15/protocol-guide-for-diplomatic-missions-en-consular-posts

Contact the Protocol Department for identity cards, Protocol Guides and further assistance:

Protocol Department Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken

Bezuidenhoutseweg 67

2594 AC The Hague

Telephone: (070) 348 64 90

Website: www.government.nl

Email: dkp@minbuza.nl

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Written by Adriana FLORES, protocol and soft diplomacy adviser and trainer at ProtocolToday Academy.

07 July 2021, The Netherlands

Category: Diplomacy

Reference: AF070721D

ProtocolToday is an expert organization, Founded by professionals with years of experience in Cultural Intelligence and Soft Diplomacy. They offer well-researched training programs to help you prepare for the international presence. Enhance your abilities to dine, converse, and present at an international stage.

Become discreet and make your mark!